A list of interesting psychological phenomena.

  • Abilene paradox:
    “A group of people collectively decide on a course of action that is counter to the preferences of many or all of the individuals in the group.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Belief perseverance:
    “Maintaining a belief despite new information that firmly contradicts it.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Bystander effect:
    “Individuals are less likely to offer help to a victim when other people are present.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Cognitive dissonance:
    “The mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Conflict of visions:
    “The intuitive feelings that people have about human nature have radically different consequences for how they think about everything from war to justice”
    Wikipedia.
  • Cartesian theater:
    “The view that there is a crucial finish line or boundary somewhere in the brain, marking a place where the order of arrival equals the order of “presentation” in experience because what happens there is what you are conscious of.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Human universals:
    “Features of culture, society, language, behavior, and psyche for which there are no known exceptions. I.e. they are common to all human societies.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Nurture assumption:
    “The misconceived idea that the personality of adults is determined chiefly by the way they were raised by their parents.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Tragedy of the commons:
    “In a shared-resource system where individual users act independently according to their own self-interest, they behave contrary to the common good of all users by depleting or spoiling that resource through their collective action.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Unscrupulous diner’s dilemma:
    “When 10 people agree to split the bill evenly, they order more expensive stuff because they only have to pay a 10th of the bill.”
    Wikipedia.
  • Wikipedia: Getting to philosophy:
    “Clicking on the first link in the main text of a Wikipedia article, and then repeating the process for subsequent articles, would usually lead to the Philosophy article.”
    Wikipedia.
  • (…)

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